Fallout 76 - Tricentennia... has been added to your Cart
Your transaction is secure
We work hard to protect your security and privacy. Our payment security system encrypts your information during transmission. We don’t share your credit card details with third-party sellers, and we don’t sell your information to others. Learn more

Fallout 76 - Tricentennial Edition for PC

Platform : Windows
3.6 out of 5 stars 206 ratings

Price: $115.58 + $7.67 Delivery
In stock.
US imports may differ from local products. Additional terms apply. Learn More.

Amazon Global Store

  • International products have separate terms and are sold from abroad and may differ from local products including fit, age rating, and language of product, labeling, or instructions.
  • Manufacturer warranty may not apply but you may have other rights under law.
  • Learn more about Amazon Global Store
Arrives: 17 - 19 Feb
Fastest delivery: 3 - 5 Feb
Ships from and sold by Amazon US.
PC
Tricentennial
  • Bethesda Game Studios, the award-winning creators of Skyrim and Fallout 4, welcome you to Fallout 76, the online prequel where every surviving human is a real person. Work together, or not, to survive. Under the threat of nuclear annihilation, you’ll experience the largest, most dynamic world ever created in the legendary Fallout universe.
  • Reclamation Day, 2102. Twenty-five years after the bombs fall, you and your fellow Vault Dwellers—chosen from the nation’s best and brightest – emerge into post-nuclear America. Play solo or join together as you explore, quest, build, and triumph against the wasteland’s greatest threats.

Amazon Global Store

  • International products have separate terms and are sold from abroad and may differ from local products including fit, age rating, and language of product, labeling, or instructions.
  • Manufacturer warranty may not apply but you may have other rights under law.
  • Learn more about Amazon Global Store

Amazon Outlet Store
Shop thousands of discounted overstock products from Amazon Outlet Store Shop now

Product details

Platform:PC  |  Edition:Tricentennial
  • Is Discontinued By Manufacturer : No
  • Package Dimensions : 18.9 x 13.6 x 1.4 cm; 68.04 Grams
  • Release date : 14 November 2018
  • ASIN : B07DN8YWLW
  • Item Model Number : FAOCDXPCPENA
  • Customer Reviews:
    3.6 out of 5 stars 206 ratings

Frequently bought together

  • Fallout 76 - Tricentennial Edition for PC
  • +
  • Super Mario Maker 2 for Nintendo Switch
Total Price: $205.55
Buy the selected items together

Have a question?

Find answers in product info, Q&As, reviews

There was a problem completing your request. Please try your search again later.
All Product Information Customer Q&A's Customer Reviews

Your question might be answered by sellers, manufacturers, or customers who bought this product.

Please make sure that you've entered a valid question. You can edit your question or post anyway.

Please enter a question.

Product description

Platform:PC  |  Edition:Tricentennial

Fallout 76 - Tricentennial Edition for PC

Bethesda Game Studios, the award-winning creators of Skyrim and Fallout 4, welcome you to Fallout 76, the online prequel where every surviving human is a real person. Work together, or not, to survive. Under the threat of nuclear annihilation, youll experience the largest, most dynamic world ever created in the legendary Fallout universe.  Reclamation Day, 2102. Twenty-five years after the bombs fall, you and your fellow Vault Dwellerschosen from the nations best and brightest emerge into post-nuclear

Features

  • You will Emerge!
  • Multiplayer finally comes to the epic open world RPGs of Bethesda Game Studios. Create your character with the S.P.E.C.I.A.L system and forge your own path in a new and untamed wasteland with hundreds of locations. Whether you journey alone or with friends, a new and unique Fallout adventure awaits.
  • Mountain Splendorland!
  • All-new graphics, lighting and landscape technology brings to life six distinct West Virginia regions. From the forests of Appalachia to the noxious crimson expanses of the Cranberry Bog, each region offers its own risks and rewards. Post-nuclear America has never looked so beautiful!
  • A New American Dream!
  • Use the all-new Construction and Assembly Mobile Platform (C.A.M.P.) to build and craft anywhere in the world. Your C.A.M.P. will provide much-needed shelter, supplies, and safety. You can even set up shop to trade goods with other survivors. But beware, not everyone will be quite so neighborly.
  • The Power of the Atom!
  • Go it alone or with fellow survivors to unlock access to the ultimate weapon Nuclear Missiles. This destruction also creates a high-level zone with rare and valuable resources. Do you protect or unleash the power of the atom? The choice is yours.


Customer Questions & Answers

Customer reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
3.6 out of 5
206 global ratings
How are ratings calculated?

Review this product

Share your thoughts with other customers

Top reviews from Australia

There are 0 reviews and 0 ratings from Australia

Top reviews from other countries

Matthew Romano
1.0 out of 5 stars This is an embarassment
Reviewed in the United States on 15 November 2018
Platform: PCEdition: TricentennialVerified Purchase
40 people found this helpful
Report abuse
Branden Lucero
1.0 out of 5 stars Tricentennial Edition is the saddest excuse for a Fallout edition so far.
Reviewed in the United States on 15 November 2018
Platform: PCEdition: TricentennialVerified Purchase
Customer image
1.0 out of 5 stars Tricentennial Edition is the saddest excuse for a Fallout edition so far.
Reviewed in the United States on 15 November 2018
Compared to what you get in Fallout 3 Collector's Edition and Fallout: New Vegas Collector's Edition, the Tricentennial Edition is absolute garbage. the former two also retailed for $79.99 ($69.99 for the PC version).

All you get is a DVD with a reversible cover and no disc. a cut out of a disc with the product key, a tiny poster, a tiny frame and a plethora DLC.

Save your money or return it now (as i will) and spend $70 on the Prima Platinum guide instead. You won't get a game, but you'll get a crap more for the money compared to this sorry excuse for an edition.
-
Images in this review
Customer image
Customer image
33 people found this helpful
Report abuse
aleigha moss
1.0 out of 5 stars Someone else said it best: Copied Review
Reviewed in the United States on 15 November 2018
Platform: PCEdition: TricentennialVerified Purchase
20 people found this helpful
Report abuse
Dos Santos Family
1.0 out of 5 stars No Disc?! Buyer Beware, Digital Download Only on $80 Game.
Reviewed in the United States on 15 November 2018
Platform: PCEdition: TricentennialVerified Purchase
20 people found this helpful
Report abuse
KeeganSCH
2.0 out of 5 stars Lots of promise, but deeply flawed at launch - and Bethesda needs to own up to that.
Reviewed in the United States on 25 November 2018
Platform: PCEdition: TricentennialVerified Purchase
Customer image
2.0 out of 5 stars Lots of promise, but deeply flawed at launch - and Bethesda needs to own up to that.
Reviewed in the United States on 25 November 2018
This review is primarily about the game itself, not the Tricentennial Edition sold by Amazon, especially since many of the issues with this incarnation of the product (not actually a physical edition, etc.) are covered by other reviewers here.

Some background: I've played about 30 hours at this point across both the beta and the release version, give or take, and I'm at around level 25. I could be higher, but I decided to just wander and explore, which - while fun - isn't a great way to level. I have, however, poked at most of the core mechanics of the game in some capacity, and I play regularly with friends who have launched nukes, found all the secrets, etc. So while I may not have first-hand experience of everything the game has to offer, I do have pretty close second-hand experience for the few things that I haven't touched.

All that said, onward to the game itself. I want to start with the positives, because I'm going to be pretty harsh toward the game in this review, and I don't want that negativity to color what are, genuinely, really good aspects of the game. While I cannot recommend this game in its current state, there's a reason I gave it two stars instead of one.

On the positive side, I think this is, far and away, the best world Bethesda has ever created. Their environmental storytelling and worldbuilding remains - as always - top notch. The game is richly atmospheric, and exploring the world - the actual act of wandering and seeing the sights itself, not necessarily the mechanics of it - is a truly rewarding experience. The audio logs and notes, though annoyingly overused, are often quite good, telling a story about a world that failed that's arguably darker than anything Fallout has done before. Hope replaced with despair, good intentions gone horribly wrong, haunting ghost towns that show you exactly what went wrong and how without ever having to tell you... it's got it all. It's genuinely a beautiful world, and that's something that has kept me playing, despite its many, many, MANY flaws. Also, the weapon and armor crafting system, though not perfect, is solid and enjoyable to interact with, as is the versatility of the new perk card system used in leveling up - even if, as I mention below, it has some serious flaws of its own. Plus, you get to explore with friends if you want to, and while it's far from a perfect system, coop in this game is genuinely enjoyable on balance. Finally, building a base is cool, even if it's often a mechanically and technically infuriating experience, and I look forward to continuing to work toward building my perfect house... after a few patches come out.

On the cons side, let's start with something that simply needs to be said: this game is a buggy, broken mess. There is literally not a single core element of this game working reliably anywhere close to 100% of the time. In fact, without much hyperbole, I think it'd be faster to list the things that DO work reliably than it would be to list the things that DON'T work reliably. Nevertheless, here's a very small sampling of the bugs I've personally encountered or experienced.

-PvP scaling is completely broken at higher levels.
-Base building, while fun, is incredibly finicky and fiddly as a system - when it works at all, that is. Sometimes you'll just lose your entire base to the void - not saved to storage, not just needing to be placed back down, gone.
-Sometimes food and drink don't work reliably.
-Sometimes people become invincible.
-Sometimes enemies become invincible.
-Sometimes people can't get into power armor without the game crashing.
-Sometimes people literally can't get out of power armor.
-NPCs regularly clip into buildings, each other, the ground, etc.
-Sometimes hostile NPCs will just stand there, doing nothing, not reacting.
-Sometimes quests will fail to progress, period, and must be abandoned and restarted... if they can be abandoned and restarted.
-Sometimes other players turn invisible. Or their armor does. Or their power armor does, turning them into a horrifying deformed monster, as getting into power armor stretches the player model to fit the power armor frame.
-Sometimes creatures vanish when you kill them, or ragdoll physics off into space and THEN despawn, or fall through the ground, preventing you from looting them. This is great fun when they're a legendary enemy that you just burned most of your ammo and stimpacks killing, just to lose out on the legendary loot that was the point of killing them in the first place.

Like I said, that's just a very small selection of the bugs. Then there's some of the appalling design choices, from a bizarre and inconsistent UI to a non-functional economy to the much-talked about and truly awful tiny S.T.A.S.H. limit. And the lack of an XP sharing system for kills, which can actively punish you for group play. There's the near-total lack of an endgame, the baffling lack of text or push-to-talk voice chat, the strange and ultimately damaging insistence on not using human NPCs in the game, the quite poor balance inherent to perk cards (some of them are completely useless, while others are ridiculously overpowered, and that has little to nothing to do with level), the poorly thought out crafting costs and item weights, etc, etc. Oh, and also, let's not forget the simple fact that it's hard to care about storylines in the game when - spoiler - everyone's dead already, and have been for years.

Put frankly, this is not a good game. It's just not. It feels like an early beta build, or maybe an Early Access title, but it is frankly insulting that they charged $60 for a game in this state at release. And yes, it's a Bethesda product, and Bethesda products are always buggy... but that really, truly isn't an excuse. It never really has been, but in this incarnation of Fallout, where there are no mods just waiting to fix Bethesda's mess, the fact that Bethesda releases incredibly buggy games is just made painfully apparent. Given how many stellar open world games have come out in the last couple years, this shouldn't be acceptable to Bethesda, either; they can no longer coast along on their reputation.

Perhaps this will become a good game. I certainly hope it does - it would be a shame to see such a beautiful world go to waste, and there honestly are some good ideas buried in this mess. But right now, it's not, and it's completely unacceptable for Bethesda to expect people to pay retail price for a game that clearly wasn't anywhere near ready for prime time. If you're interested in giving it a try, I strongly encourage you to wait six months. Maybe a year. If it's going to be a good game, Bethesda needs to get its act together and make it a good game. Don't pay them for the privilege of doing their internal testing work for them.
Images in this review
Customer image
Customer image
8 people found this helpful
Report abuse