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Gulliver's Travels Paperback – 18 October 2012

4.3 out of 5 stars 2,530 ratings

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Product details

  • Publisher : Apple Publishing International (18 October 2012)
  • Language : English
  • ISBN-10 : 8179044289
  • ISBN-13 : 978-8179044285
  • Customer Reviews:
    4.3 out of 5 stars 2,530 ratings

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4.3 out of 5 stars
4.3 out of 5
2,530 global ratings
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Top reviews from Australia

Reviewed in Australia on 6 March 2020
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Reviewed in Australia on 7 April 2017
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Reviewed in Australia on 2 June 2015
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Reviewed in Australia on 26 September 2019
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3.0 out of 5 stars A closet libertarian
By B. Chandler on 26 September 2019
It is not Jonathan Swift’s fault that the writing is archaic. This may be over looked if it was not so redundant and trivial. It can easily put you to sleep.

We all know that these stories are supposed to a thin veil for an agenda. Everyone from H. G. Wells to Ayn Rand hit you over the head with their agenda form the first. But no Jonathan rattles with 10 pages to describe what is in his pockets included his hidden pocket. (Who Cares?) And the book is filled with mundane descriptions. I think he is using this to flesh out what would be a 25 page manifesto. It is not until you get half way through the book that, with the exception of a few snide remarks about kings he finally coughs up his point.

“…, whether a private man’s house might not be better defended by himself, his children, and family, then by half-a-dozen rascals, picked up at a venture in the streets for small wages, who might get a hundred times more by cutting their throats?”

He goes on to pick on just about all the politics and ventures of England at the time. Paranoid readers can see the parallels from the book and today’s news. However, if it is that important than dump Swift and just watch the news.

Anyhow it is not worth the time to read this book unless you are interested in someone that defecates at the end of his chain and dells about it in detail.
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TOP 100 REVIEWER
Reviewed in Australia on 26 September 2019
Customer image
3.0 out of 5 stars A closet libertarian
By B. Chandler on 26 September 2019
It is not Jonathan Swift’s fault that the writing is archaic. This may be overlooked if it was not so redundant and trivial. It can easily put you to sleep.

We all know that these stories are supposed to a thin veil for an agenda. Everyone from H. G. Wells to Ayn Rand hit you over the head with their agenda form the first. But no Jonathan rattles with 10 pages to describe what is in his pockets included his hidden pocket. (Who Cares?) And the book is filled with mundane descriptions. I think he is using this to flesh out what would be a 25-page manifesto. It is not until you get halfway through the book that, with the exception of a few snide remarks about kings he finally coughs up his point.

“…, whether a private man’s house might not be better defended by himself, his children, and family, then by half-a-dozen rascals, picked up at a venture in the streets for small wages, who might get a hundred times more by cutting their throats?”

He goes on to pick on just about all the politics and ventures of England at the time. Paranoid readers can see the parallels from the book and today’s news. However, if it is that important than dump Swift and just watch the news.

Anyhow it is not worth the time to read this book unless you are interested in someone that defecates at the end of his chain and dells about it in detail.
Images in this review
Customer image
Customer image
TOP 100 REVIEWER
Reviewed in Australia on 26 September 2019
Customer image
3.0 out of 5 stars A closet libertarian
By B. Chandler on 26 September 2019
It is not Jonathan Swift’s fault that the writing is archaic. This may be overlooked if it was not so redundant and trivial. It can easily put you to sleep.

We all know that these stories are supposed to a thin veil for an agenda. Everyone from H. G. Wells to Ayn Rand hit you over the head with their agenda form the first. But no Jonathan rattles with 10 pages to describe what is in his pockets included his hidden pocket. (Who Cares?) And the book is filled with mundane descriptions. I think he is using this to flesh out what would be a 25-page manifesto. It is not until you get halfway through the book that, with the exception of a few snide remarks about kings he finally coughs up his point.

“…, whether a private man’s house might not be better defended by himself, his children, and family, then by half-a-dozen rascals, picked up at a venture in the streets for small wages, who might get a hundred times more by cutting their throats?”

He goes on to pick on just about all the politics and ventures of England at the time. Paranoid readers can see the parallels from the book and today’s news. However, if it is that important than dump Swift and just watch the news.

Anyhow it is not worth the time to read this book unless you are interested in someone that defecates at the end of his chain and dells about it in detail.
Images in this review
Customer image
Customer image
TOP 100 REVIEWER
Reviewed in Australia on 26 September 2019
Customer image
3.0 out of 5 stars A closet libertarian
By B. Chandler on 26 September 2019
It is not Jonathan Swift’s fault that the writing is archaic. This may be overlooked if it was not so redundant and trivial. It can easily put you to sleep.

We all know that these stories are supposed to a thin veil for an agenda. Everyone from H. G. Wells to Ayn Rand hit you over the head with their agenda form the first. But no Jonathan rattles with 10 pages to describe what is in his pockets included his hidden pocket. (Who Cares?) And the book is filled with mundane descriptions. I think he is using this to flesh out what would be a 25-page manifesto. It is not until you get halfway through the book that, with the exception of a few snide remarks about kings he finally coughs up his point.

“…, whether a private man’s house might not be better defended by himself, his children, and family, then by half-a-dozen rascals, picked up at a venture in the streets for small wages, who might get a hundred times more by cutting their throats?”

He goes on to pick on just about all the politics and ventures of England at the time. Paranoid readers can see the parallels from the book and today’s news. However, if it is that important than dump Swift and just watch the news.

Anyhow it is not worth the time to read this book unless you are interested in someone that defecates at the end of his chain and dells about it in detail.
Images in this review
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Top reviews from other countries

M. Dowden
5.0 out of 5 stars Lemuel Gulliver
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 22 October 2018
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10 people found this helpful
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WorcesterBlue
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 1 July 2019
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5 people found this helpful
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Connor Lynch
3.0 out of 5 stars Charming, But Dated
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 11 July 2019
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3 people found this helpful
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E
3.0 out of 5 stars This is an abridged version of the book.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 21 November 2020
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3.0 out of 5 stars This is an abridged version of the book.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 21 November 2020
For example, Ch. 5 ends with "never once mentioned them to me." while the full text contains more paragraphs.

... never once mentioned them to me. However, it was not long before I had an opportunity of doing his majesty, at least as I then thought, a most signal service. I was alarmed at midnight with the cries of many hundred people at my door; by which, being suddenly awaked, I was in some kind of terror. I heard the word Burglum repeated incessantly: several of the emperor's court, ..... for her use: and, in the presence of her chief confidents could not forbear vowing revenge."
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Phoebe
5.0 out of 5 stars Such an overrated book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 10 November 2018
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3 people found this helpful
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