The Sun Is Also a Star
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The Sun Is Also a Star Audible Audiobook – Unabridged

4.6 out of 5 stars 4,535 ratings

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Product details

Listening Length 8 hours and 4 minutes
Author Nicola Yoon
Narrator Bahni Turpin, Raymond Lee, Dominic Hoffman
Whispersync for Voice Ready
Audible.com.au Release Date 01 November 2016
Publisher Listening Library
Program Type Audiobook
Version Unabridged
Language English
ASIN B01K5VUGJI
Best Sellers Rank 39,942 in Audible Books & Originals (See Top 100 in Audible Books & Originals)
18 in Fiction on Emotions & Feelings for Teens
40 in Fiction About New Experiences for Young Adults
128 in Fiction About Emotions & Feelings for Young Adults

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4.6 out of 5 stars
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Top reviews from Australia

Reviewed in Australia on 21 July 2019
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Reviewed in Australia on 23 January 2020
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4.0 out of 5 stars Exceeded my expectations.
By Casey Carlisle on 23 January 2020
Actual rating 4.5 stars.

‘The Sun Is Also a Star’ exceeded any expectations I had. When it was first released there was a lot of hype, and I tend to wait and read later without any influence to sway my opinion. But I had to get a move on with the release of the film adaptation.

A contemporary narrated in alternating points of view between teens Natasha, a Jamaican native, grown up in New York about to be deported; and Daniel, a Korean-American with ‘tiger’ parents pushing him towards a Yale application and becoming a doctor, despite his passion for poetry. We also get the occasional factoid chapter around physics, science, or a side characters perspective/history/future.

We see social issues of interracial relationships, racism (and typecasting), immigration (both legal and illegal), mixed in with identity, and coming of age all at that tender age where the world flips on its head – graduation of high school. It was a hot-bed of themes and issues to create a passionate contemporary.

The pacing did not lag anywhere in this novel – which is high praise for contemporary. Usually they are introspective, symbolic, and take some time to build. ‘The Sun is Also a Star’ set the stakes high straight away and kept the pressure on until the end.

We also get a pizza slice of the New York landscape. Coffee shops, record stores, the tourist strip, the corporate buildings – it was an almost magical depiction of the city as seen through the eyes of our protagonists.

The family dynamics of both Daniel and Natasha are also a great peek into how POC are depicted, and how their culture shape their behaviour.

I did find the ending typical of contemporaries, ending in that ‘what if’ moment, leaving the reader to make up their own mind as to what happens after the last page. But it does this with an unexpected flair and twist that I enjoyed.

One theme that is strongly resonating throughout is that we are made up of the same molecules as the universe, proving that everything is connected. It pushes this further by playing with fate, predetermination, and how universal forces follow an order about things. I found it poetic. Sometimes it can be cliché, but ‘The Sun Is Also a Star’ managed to pull it off with sophistication.
I’m wondering if they will be able to replicate that some tone with the screen adaptation, or if it will come off as cheesy.

Took me a while to get around to read this one, but very glad I finally have and give this a huge shiny recommendation.
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Reviewed in Australia on 7 September 2019

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Simant Verma
5.0 out of 5 stars Cute & magical!
Reviewed in India on 17 February 2018
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65 people found this helpful
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Yasmin Darharbah
4.0 out of 5 stars So amazing that it brought tears to my eyes for literally no reason!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 8 September 2018
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4.0 out of 5 stars So amazing that it brought tears to my eyes for literally no reason!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 8 September 2018
The Sun Is Also a Star, is a touching story about two teenagers who deserve the chance to get to know each other, but risk having it ripped away from them before it’s even really begun. The novel takes place in New York City, where Natasha is on a mission to save her family from being deported back to Jamaica. On her journey she meets Daniel, who, due to a combination of bizarre and seemingly meant-to-be moments, notices her from afar and feels that he must get to know her. Over the course of their day, Daniel tries to undermine Natasha’s belief that both love and fate aren’t real, and that science explains everything.
It’s a beautiful read, consistently making me want to laugh and cry, and question my own opinions in regard to how the universe works.

Firstly, I’d like to mention that the cover art for this book is absolutely stunning. Upon finishing it, I understood its meaning immediately: that every second, different people, things and circumstances are all brought together, and they clash to create an outburst of consequences that have a huge impact on the rest of our lives. We make hundreds of decisions every single day, and each of these decisions leads to a different future where hundreds of more decisions lie. The outcome depends on which route we take. The cover and the novel, both encourage readers to think about everything they do with an open mind, and to be careful with how we effect other people’s journeys.

Leading on from that, I love how every event in the novel was interlinked with another, how every person we were introduced to either had a hand in how Daniel and Natasha’s lives played out, or vice-versa. It shows how even saying one kind (or rude) word to a stranger can influence them to make a huge life-changing decision.

The novel also dealt well with racism and how young people cope with having extremely prejudice parents. Daniel’s father’s disrespect towards Natasha and his embarrassment, I felt was written incredibly well and worked towards giving the characters more dimension. It’s realistic to write, not only about two characters who are both considered minorities in Twenty-First Century America, but who also don’t conform to the stereotypes placed on them. Daniel’s issues with his Korean parents wanting what’s best for him instead of what makes him happiest, and Natasha’s father wanting what’s best for himself instead of what’s best for his family, gives them common ground which many readers will be able to identify with. Yoon portrays realistic family dynamics in showing that they are complicated and hardly ever perfect.

Although I loved The Sun Is Also a Star, the reason I’m not giving it five stars, is that it was a little hard to get into. I think this was because the chapters started off very short and kept switching perspectives, however I understand that this was necessary to get the whole concept across. More into the middle I began to enjoy the short chapters because they gave us access to what each character was thinking in any particular moment. Something else that bothered me, was Natasha’s personality. As brutal as that sounds, she was a bit hard to like because of her pessimistic nature and how rude she was to Daniel at times, but as the story went on and he warmed her heart, she was much easier to read.

The ending was absolutely amazing – so amazing that it brought tears to my eyes for literally no reason! I wholeheartedly recommend this book as it really can change your entire viewpoint on the world and our day-to-day lives. 4 stars to Nicola Yoon’s, The Sun Is Also a Star. Brilliant.
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13 people found this helpful
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Ninaminacat
4.0 out of 5 stars Well worth the read for adults of all ages
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 6 March 2019
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3 people found this helpful
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Miss K. Southern
4.0 out of 5 stars Such a clever layout and important message, but some will hate the gushy insta-love...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 28 January 2018
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6 people found this helpful
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Mrs. Lj Hart
4.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant beautiful story
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 11 September 2021
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